Saving A $ 100,000 Down Payment

Greetings readers! I have some big news: My boyfriend proposed on September 21 and we’re engaged! He proposed after a 4km hike in the rocky mountains — and I used the car ride home to snapchat shots of the ring to all my cousins and call my parents.

Want to put six-figures down on your first home?

This is how my fiance and I are saving a $ 100 000 down payment!

me & my husband-to-be at my cousin's wedding this past July

me & my husband-to-be at my cousin’s wedding this past July

I’m still not used to saying “fiancé” but “my betrothed” confuses people and takes up too many characters on twitter.

We’re still deciding what kind of wedding we want — both of us have the same financial values, so it’s hard to think of spending tens of thousands of dollars on a single day. On the other hand, it’s hard for me to turn down the opportunity to throw a really big party ;) We haven’t set a date, but we’re thinking Fall 2015. Right now I’m in a rush to find a decent venue for that time. Many I’ve called area already booked for Sept/Oct next year, and I’m hesitant to go later because there will be snow on the ground.

I don’t know how much I’ll be blogging about wedding planning.

Firstly, because I know enough about the wedding industry to be an unwilling participant in much of the nonsense beyond a decent dinner and an open bar. I don’t care. I just don’t freaking care about bridesmaids and wedding colors and centrepieces and having a Say-Yes-To-The-Dress moment. This isn’t new: I’ve been singing this tune since 2011.

Secondly, because I’m so sick of reading “frugal wedding” posts (sorry recently married PF blog friends!) that I can’t justify contributing to the collection. There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of personal finance blogs that have done excellent posts on how to save money on your wedding. You don’t need me here, kids.

That said, I do have a lot to say about getting married, so I’ll be blogging about that soon.

We’ve been sharing finances since we moved in together, but now that we’ve committed to sharing a life together, we’re now sharing major financial goals. The first?

We’re saving a $ 100 000 down-payment on a home.

If you think that number is totally ridic, I don’t blame you. But I recently blogged about Calgary real estate prices where we live, and $100,000 is an appropriate sum to ensure we’re putting over 20% down. It’s important to pay for at least 20% of your home’s value in the down-payment to avoid insurance fees. By putting 20% down (or more, depending on the final purchase price), we’re ensuring a lower monthly payment, a more affordable mortgage, and starting with a strong equity stake in our first property.

How are we going to save such a large sum in 2-3 years?

The most obvious way is there’s two of us contributing, which means we each need to save $50,000. $50,000 is still a big number, but it’s not nearly as intimidating as $100K. Both my fiancé (god, still so weird to say that) and I are savers, so we’re not starting from scratch, and there are some tools to help us:

Each of us can withdraw up to $25,000 from our RRSPs under the first-time homebuyers plan to be used as a down-payment, giving us $50,000 together. I’ve set a personal goal to get a $100,000 RRSP by age 33, which means withdrawing $25,000 (that I have to pay back within 15 years) will not eviscerate my retirement accounts. Options like this are available all over the world, such as the Homestart first home buyers grant Perth, so it’s worthwhile to see what’s available where you live. It is very important to me NOT to have all my funds in one place, and that includes a home. Since I’ve already saved a significant amount of money in my RRSPs, my goal right now is rebalancing so I don’t have to sell more profitable investments, such as stocks, when I make the withdrawal under the first-time homebuyers plan. I’m hoping my RRSP withdrawal under the HBP will be primarily cash and a low-cost mutual fund, with the bulk of my retirement savings remaining in stocks and ETFs. I recently bought a 2-year GIC RRSP to plan for this.

This leaves only $25,000 each to save up outside of our RRSPs. Now, don’t get me wrong, $25,000 is not petty change, but with a 2 or 3 year timeframe it’s very manageable — mostly, again, because we’re not starting from zero. The TFSA contribution limit is currently at $31,000 with another $5,500 to be added for 2016. Since I withdrew a ton of money out of my TFSA over the past 1.5 years to go back to school for my MBA, I’m actually not sure if I’ll be able to max out my TFSA in the next 2-3 years since now I have to catch up and save up to the new contribution limits, but at least I can get over $25,000. Again, I am hesitant to sell profitable investments like stocks and ETFs or wipe out my Emergency Fund which I also keep in my TFSA, but it’s still the best account tax-wise for saving, so it’s better to put my down-payment fund money here than anywhere else.

When we buy a house and how much we put down will depend on a lot more than just saving up $100,000 — such as market fluctuations, interest rate changes, and even what city we live in (I think we’ll stay in Calgary, but I’d be open to moving to another major Canadian city if our jobs took us there). In the meantime, saving now means being prepared to take advantage of opportunities later.

What are your thoughts on our $ 100 000 down payment? How much did you save for your first home? What are your strategies for putting money away?