All posts by: Bridget Casey

About the author
Student debt killer, super saver, and stock market addict. BSc. in Chemistry from the University of Alberta, MBA in Finance from the University of Calgary, and PhD from the school of life in being a badass. Currently residing in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, but hooked on travelling.

GIVEAWAY: Rich New Year 2017

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I’m kicking off the New Year with a HUGE giveaway to help you start off 2017 on the right financial foot. There’s over $1,000 in awesome prizes to be won. ENTER THE GIVEAWAY HERE For more details on the prizes, check them out below! Bank in the Form of a Pig by Areaware (1 valued at $220 USD) Babe is the unofficial mascot of Money After Graduation and my favorite piggy bank/piece of art in my home. The grand prize winner will receive a Babe of their very own (name can be changed) in a color of their choosing. This is a piggy bank cast from a pig that died of natural causes. The bank is available in chrome and matte finishes in various colors, and holds up to $10,000 in one-dollar bills. Tile Slim & Tile Mate (4 sets valued at $55 USD ea.) If you’ve been reading my blog or […]

9 Personal Finance Books To Read This Year

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After my last post, How To Transform Your Finances in 12 Months, many of you were curious what personal finance books I’ll be reading in 2017. At the time I hadn’t decided completely, so I asked you for suggestions and gave it some thought, and this is the list I’ve come up with! MONEY – Master The Game: 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom by Tony Robbins I’ve heard Tony Robbins interviewed a few times on the Tim Ferriss podcast, as well as watched his documentary, I Am Not Your Guru, on Netflix. While I think he’s a little over the top sometimes, I love his direct and inspiring approach to problem solving. Nevertheless, I’m not sure what to expect from this book so I wouldn’t say I have high hopes. We’ll see. From Amazon: “Based on extensive research and one-on-one interviews with more than 50 of the most legendary […]

How To Transform Your Finances in 12 Months

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I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: financial strategies are better than financial plans. This is a mindset the focuses on developing good financial habits instead of worrying about every penny. This way you reap all the rewards of consistency, while still being open to new opportunities and resilient to unexpected setbacks. So instead of worrying about the numbers, I hope you approach the next 12 as an opportunity to hone good financial behaviors instead of trying to hit arbitrary goals — I promise, you’ll far surpass the goals if you have the right methods in place. Below are a few suggestions! Make a flexible budget A flexible budget slightly overestimates variable expenses, includes a buffer for miscellaneous or unexpected costs, and includes spending money for leisure and fun. The easiest way to make your budget work is to earn more money. But the second easiest way is to simply […]

Financial Literacy Month Recap

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I spent most of November in Toronto celebrating Financial Literacy Month. I teamed up with Tangerine – my bank of seven years! I have been banking with Tangerine since 2009, and have made them my primary bank because of their no-fee daily chequing account and their high-interest savings accounts. I’ve also been investing in their Tangerine Investment Funds for years. I love the flexibility, accessibility, and availability of banking from Tangerine, which is why I was so excited to work with them for November! We kicked off the month with a live financial literacy workshop for millennials at BrainStation on November 3rd, where I provided my tips on budgeting, paying off debt, saving and getting started investing. Financial literacy is a lifelong lesson Many people feel overwhelmed by the amount of information they believe they need to know to manage their money. A recent survey by Tangerine found that only […]

How to Protect Yourself From Fraud and Identity Theft

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A few years ago, I tried to buy a coffee before a shift at my part-time retail store job, and my TD debit card was declined. A few minutes later, I received a phone call from my bank asking if I had recently made a withdrawal from an ATM for $300 – on the other side of the country. Since I hadn’t flown from Montreal to Edmonton at the speed of sound earlier that morning, it was obvious the cash withdrawal wasn’t mine. My information had been stolen! My debit card was immediately cancelled and the $300 was returned to my account, but I had to wait a few days for my new debit card and PIN to arrive in the mail. I’m not sure how or where my account information was compromised, but that was the first time I was the victim of identity theft. Scam artists will use […]